Overview
Accessory navicular syndrome is the painful condition caused by the presence of the accessory navicular. Well, is the statement a bit confusing? Let me explain. The accessory navicular is a bone in the foot that is not supposed to be present. But in some very rare cases, this extra bone (sometimes Can Pilates make you look taller? also be a cartilage piece) is present by birth. This bone exists in the arch of the foot. The presence of this bone though not common, is not abnormal either as most people are not even aware of its existence unless and until it begins to cause pain which we call accessory navicular syndrome.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes
Let us see the reasons why the tendon or the bone would get aggravated. Ankle or foot sprain, irritation of the bone caused by footwear, overusing the foot, quite common in athletes and dancers. People born with this extra bone are also known develop flat feet which also adds to the strain on the posterior tibial tendon and lead to the syndrome.

Symptoms
It?s common for any symptoms to present during adolescence, when bones are maturing, though problems may not occur until adulthood. You may notice a bony prominence on the inner side of the midfoot. There may or may not be redness and swelling around this bump, especially if it rubs against footwear. You may be prone to blisters or sores in the area. Pain generally involves a vague ache or throbbing in the midfoot and arch as well, especially when you?re active. Many people with this syndrome develop flat feet, too, which can create additional strain in the foot.

Diagnosis
Plain x-rays are used to determine the size of the accessory navicular. There are three main types of accessory navicular bones: a small bone embedded within the nearby posterior tibial tendon; a triangular shaped bone connected to the navicular by thick cartilage; and a large prominent navicular tuberosity thought to represent an accessory navicular that has fused to the navicular. If the status of the posterior tibial tendon needs to be assessed or if other problems are suspected, (ex. Navicular stress fracture) it may be necessary to perform an MRI. Although this is not considered routine, an MRI may be helpful in identifying the degree of irritation. An MRI would demonstrate fluid or edema that may accumulate in the bone as a result of the irritation.

Non Surgical Treatment
A combination of the following non-surgical treatments may be used to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome. Immobilizing the foot with a cast or a removable walking boot allows the foot to rest and reduces inflammation. Applying ice to the affected area is an effective way to reduce swelling and inflammation. Wrap a bag of ice with a thin towel and apply for intervals of 15 to 20 minutes. Never put ice directly on the skin. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including aspirin or ibuprofen might be prescribed. Sometimes, a combination of immobilization and oral or injected corticosteroid medications may reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy may be prescribed to include exercises and treatments that increase muscle strength, decrease inflammation and help prevent the recurrence of symptoms. Custom orthotic devices worn in the shoe provide arch support and may prevent future symptoms from developing. The symptoms of this syndrome may reappear even after successful treatment. If so, non-surgical treatments are often repeated.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
If non-surgical treatment fails to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome, surgery may be appropriate. Surgery may involve removing the accessory bone, reshaping the area, and repairing the posterior tibial tendon to improve its function. This extra bone is not needed for normal foot function.

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برچسب ها : Can you stretch to get taller? ، How can I increase my height after 18? ، Why do they call it the Achilles heel? ،
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نوشته شده توسط Paulette Gaytan در يکشنبه 22 مرداد 1396 و ساعت 21:16
Overview
Everyone has one navicular bone: one of the small bones of the foot. A small number of people have a second small navicular bone or piece of cartilage located on the inside of the foot just above the arch: both are simply called an "accessary navicular bone." It is located within the posterior tibial tendon which attaches in this area. It is easy to see as a "bump." Most that have it never have pain. If they get pain, we call it: "Accessary navicular bone syndrome."

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes
It is commonly believed that the posterior tibial tendon loses its vector of pull to heighten the arch. As the posterior muscle contracts, the tendon is no longer pulling straight up on the navicular but must course around the prominence of bone and first pull medially before pulling upward. In addition, the enlarged bones may irritate and damage the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon, making it less functional. Therefore, the presence of the accessory navicular bone does contribute to posterior tibial dysfunction.

Symptoms
If you develop accessory navicular syndrome, you may experience a throbbing sensation or other types of pain in your midfoot or arch (especially while or right after you use the foot heavily, such as during exercise), and you may notice a bony prominence on the interior of your foot above the arch. This prominence may become inflamed, which means it will likely feel warm to the touch, look red and swollen, and will probably hurt.

Diagnosis
The foot and ankle are prone to bony ?accessories? which usually have no accompanying symptoms. Accessory navicular syndrome is often diagnosed when an adolescent complains of pain in the foot. Girls are more susceptible than boys, and the condition is usually bilateral, occurring in both feet. Navicular accessory syndrome may be diagnosed when a trauma (foot or ankle sprain) aggravates the bone or tibial tendon, or when there is chronic irritation from footwear or overuse.

Non Surgical Treatment
The goal of non-surgical treatment for accessory navicular syndrome is to relieve the symptoms. The following may be used. Immobilization. Placing the foot in a cast or removable walking boot allows the affected area to rest and decreases the inflammation. Ice. To reduce swelling, a bag of ice covered with a thin towel is applied to the affected area. Do not put ice directly on the skin. Medications. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be prescribed. In some cases, oral or injected steroid medications may be used in combination with immobilization to reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy. Physical therapy may be prescribed, including exercises and treatments to strengthen the muscles and decrease inflammation. The exercises may also help prevent recurrence of the symptoms. Orthotic devices. Custom orthotic devices that fit into the shoe provide support for the arch, and may play a role in preventing future symptoms. Even after successful treatment, the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome sometimes reappear. When this happens, non-surgical approaches are usually repeated.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
If all nonsurgical measures fail and the fragment continues to be painful, surgery may be recommended. The most common procedure used to treat the symptomatic accessory navicular is the Kidner procedure. A small incision is made in the instep of the foot over the accessory navicular. The accessory navicular is then detached from the posterior tibial tendon and removed from the foot. The posterior tibial tendon is reattached to the remaining normal navicular. Following the procedure, the skin incision is closed with stitches, and a bulky bandage and splint are applied to the foot and ankle. You may need to use crutches for several days after surgery. Your stitches will be removed in 10 to 14 days (unless they are the absorbable type, which will not need to be taken out). Can you get an operation to make you taller? should be safe to be released to full activity in about six weeks.

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برچسب ها : How do you get taller? ، How do you get Achilles tendonitis? ، How much does it cost to lengthen your legs? ،
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نوشته شده توسط Paulette Gaytan در يکشنبه 22 مرداد 1396 و ساعت 20:49
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